Mar 252019
 

On Monday, 1 April 2019, Malcolm Austen will talk to Oxfordshire Family History Society (OFHS) and visitors on Apps for Family Historians, at the Exeter Hall, Kidlington, OX5 1AB, at 7:30pm (you’re welcome from 7:15pm).

Malcolm says that his talk is about ancillary Apps that Family Historians will (may) find useful during research trips. There will be a bias towards Apps that can be run on (and synchronized between) smart phones and desktops or laptops.

Non-members of OFHS are very welcome to come to the meeting!

For those who can’t attend, we hope to have a summary of the talk put in the Members Own Area in due course.  https://moa.ofhs.org.uk/

 

Mar 112019
 

A new family history event takes place on the 26 to 27 April at Alexandra Place, London.  The event provides an extensive range of lectures, full details of which can be found via this link https://familytr.ee/lecture.

OFHS will be attending what promises to be an exciting event.  We will have our CD’s of Parish Records and Monumental Inscriptions on sale together with the full range of Black Sheep Books.  We will also be providing a search service to help find that elusive ancestor.  We look forward to seeing you.

Feb 262019
 

On Monday, 25 March, Mark Davies will talk to Oxfordshire FHS on:

An unexpected discovery of Indian ancestry in Oxfordshire (via Ireland)

Mark’s Indian heritage came as a complete surprise, realised only because of the totally unexpected revelation in the 1881 census that a great grandfather had been born in Calcutta. This in turn led to the discovery of an Oxfordshire heritage of considerable antiquity and a somewhat bizarre coincidence of Indian/Irish ancestral landownership in Oxford. He will discuss Some Dos and Don’ts of Indian ancestral research (via Ireland and Oxfordshire) and how to take the first research steps in dealing with Ancestors in India. 

Mark Davies is an Oxford local historian, author, and guide with a particular knowledge of the history and literature of the city’s waterways, including the Oxford realities which underlie Lewis Carroll’s ‘Alice’. This interest stems from having lived on a canalboat in central Oxford since 1992. A biography of the Oxford pastry cook and first English aeronaut James Sadler – from a family with very long Oxford associations – is the most recent addition to his range of local publications.

We meet at the Exeter Hall, Oxford Road, Kidlington, OX5 1AB, with the talk starting at 8:00pm. Doors open at 7:15pm, when there will be advisors offering computer and genealogy help, and tea and coffee will be available. Non-members are very welcome, though we have a charge of £2 as an entrance fee for them to contribute towards the hire of the hall and the costs of speakers.

Feb 172019
 

Oxfordshire FHS is pleased to announce a new library helpdesk – at Woodstock library, now housed in the Oxfordshire Museum in Woodstock.

Phil Isherwood will be available to help enquirers with their family history on alternate Wednesdays, 12noon – 4pm, starting on 20 February. Whilst having access to a variety of Oxfordshire records, Phil, like all our advisors, is also happy to tackle questions about other areas, and also military matters.

Help sessions at Woodstock library can be booked by phoning the library on 01993 814124.

See https://www.ofhs.org.uk/#meetus for other helpdesks across the county.

Feb 012019
 

On Monday, 4 February 2019, Alan Simpson will talk to Oxfordshire Family History Society (OFHS) and visitors on Photographing and Transcribing Old Books, at the Exeter Hall, Kidlington, OX5 1AB, at 7:30pm (you’re welcome earlier!).

Alan has been photographing various books both for OFHS and his own family use, since first getting a digital camera around the year 2001. During the course of this he has come up with a number of techniques for making the job easier. In his talk he will be describing these and illustrating the results from an assortment of books ranging from an amazingly neat copy book written in 1860 by his then 13 year old step great grandfather to the amazingly untidy collected notes of a mid 19th century vicar of Forest Hill.

Alan is very involved with OFHS, from being Monumental Inscriptions Co-ordinator, to carrying out searches in the OFHS databases for clients, to being lead on the computer group panel.

Non-members of OFHS are very welcome to come to the meeting!

Feb 012019
 

OFHS is now able to take payment via PayPal. This secure system is very useful for many purposes: including joining OFHS or renewing your subscription or purchasing the latest three Memorial Inscriptions CDs (for Sandford, Littlemore, and Wroxton). Many people use PayPal to pay for a wide variety of services elsewhere and can now make these payments easily to Oxfordshire Family History Society.

Jan 292019
 

On Monday, 25 February, Julian Hunt will talk to Oxfordshire FHS on:

Julian’s talk Coaching Days on the Oxford Road brings together his knowledge of the turnpike trusts which greatly improved the condition of our main roads in the 18th century, the stage coached which plied between the major towns and the coaching inns where the travellers broke their journeys.

Julian Hunt was born in Romsley, Worcestershire in 1949. He began his career at Birmingham Reference Library in 1968 and was Local Studies Librarian in Oldham, Lancashire, from 1976. He was co-author of The Cotton Mills of Oldham, now in its third edition. He moved to Buckinghamshire in 1988 to become the County’s first Local Studies Librarian. He has written numerous histories of Buckinghamshire towns, including A History of Amersham (2001) A History of Gerrards Cross (2006) and A History of Beaconsfield (2009).

We meet at the Exeter Hall, Oxford Road, Kidlington, OX5 1AB, with the talk starting at 8:00pm. Doors open at 7:15pm, when there will be advisors offering computer and genealogy help, and tea and coffee will be available. Non-members are very welcome, though we have a charge of £2 as an entrance fee for them to contribute towards the hire of the hall and the costs of speakers.

Jan 232019
 

More surname musings. If anyone has any comments do get back in touch.

TOWERSEY/TOWSEY – we believe comes from the place Towersey, near Thame but there seem to be two groups in Oxfordshire – one spelt Towersey (that is more common in the Banbury area initially) and one Towsey which was in Bicester but is more common in the south of the county. Does anyone know a connection between the two?

There is an early TRUELOCKE family in Iffley but then they were manly in the Appleford/Sutton Courtneay area. Does anyone know where this family was before it came to Oxfordshire?

If ayone has very early instances of GOLD (or variant ancestors) in the 16th and, ideally, earlier centuries we’d be keen to know.

We don’t think BATT(S) and BETT(S) are the same name but are keen to see if anyone has any overlaps in their family trees.

 

As always we are very keen to get more males DNA tested with some of these key surnames so do contact us if you are willing.

surname-project@ofhs.org.uk

 

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox

Join other followers: