Oct 022018
 

On Monday, 22 October, Helen Ford will talk to Oxfordshire FHS on:

Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy … Family History and Trade Unions

This illustrated talk will provide an introduction to the Modern Records Centre at Warwick University and an overview of the wide range of occupations and trade union collections held there. Using several examples of different trade unions archives Helen will provide details of the specific types of membership records and the information they often contain, including marital status, employer, sickness and unemployment payments, retirement and cause of death. The talk will focus on the transport workers, carpenters and printing trades. It will also touch on other sources in the collections such as photographs and records of social activities.

Helen has been an archivist for over 30 years and has been Archive Manager at the Modern Records Centre, University of Warwick for the past 11 years. Previous posts were at Devon County Record Office, Sheffield City Archives and Rochester Archive service. She has also worked as archivist for Laura Ashley plc and British Gas plc. Helen has worked on her own family tree and given many talks on archive sources for genealogists.

We meet at the Exeter Hall, Oxford Road, Kidlington, OX5 1AB, with the talk starting at 8:00pm. Doors open at 7:15pm, when there will be advisors offering computer and genealogy help, and tea and coffee will be available.

Sep 242018
 

On Monday, 1 October 2018, the subject of the Oxfordshire Family History Society meeting will be ‘Research Techniques using Online Resources’, with the talk given by Elizabeth Mills.

Elizabeth says:
This will be a special bring and share session. Starting with my own best ‘hit’ from Airbnb!! Intrigued? I hope so!
Please can you bring examples of websites you have used to break down brick walls?
We hope to learn from one another how to keep clear notes of the origins of information, remembering to check and double check. Expect online research to lead to long walks, and expect surprising outcomes.
The session will end with the story of how we confirmed the cousin whose grandmother WAS legitimate and therefore she IS my cousin in Wallingford.
 
We meet at the Exeter Hall, Oxford Road, Kidlington, OX5 1AB, with the meeting starting at 7:30pm. Doors open at 7:15pm.  The talk is open to all; non-members are very welcome.

Image is of King William II of the Netherlands.

Jul 242018
 

On Monday, 6 August 2018, the subject of the Oxfordshire Family History Society meeting will be ‘Sharing your data with other people’, with the talk given by Kevin Poile.

Kevin says that his talk will involve a look at the things you need to consider when sharing your family tree information with other people, be they family or other researchers who have a common ancestry. There will be a look at GEDCOM files and the benefits and drawbacks of using them. He will also look at some of the different media devices available. Kevin will demonstrate how using the same techniques for sharing your data can be used to help stop you losing all your data in case of a system failure. He will also show how he’s created a totally free on-line presence for the work he’s done for St Catherine’s College.  The same principles can be used by anybody else for sharing information.

Kevin is  a member of the Oxfordshire FHS computer group panel, and also of its executive committee.

We meet at the Exeter Hall, Oxford Road, Kidlington, OX5 1AB, with the meeting starting at 7:30pm. Doors open at 7:15pm.  Both members and non-members will be very welcome.

 

Jul 242018
 

On Monday, 24 September, Liz Woolley will talk to Oxfordshire FHS on:

66 Men of Grandpont 1914-18

Sixty-six men are named on the First World War memorial in St Matthew’s church in Grandpont in south Oxford. In 2015 a team of local volunteers set out to learn more about these men, the neighbourhood they left behind, and the impact of the First World War on this one small Victorian suburb. The result is an innovative community history project which has uncovered some surprises, involved hundreds of people and captured the imaginations of those far beyond the local area. This talk explores some of the 66 men’s lives and explains how the project provides a model for other local groups who are thinking of carrying out similar work. Excerpts from a documentary film which has been made as part of the project will be shown. 

Liz lives in Oxford and has an MSc in English Local History from the University’s Department for Continuing Education. In 2015-16 she co-ordinated a community history project, ’66 Men of Grandpont 1914-18′, which researched the lives of the men named on the First World War memorial in St Matthew’s church in south Oxford. The project involved hundreds of local people and resulted in a poppy trail around the streets of Grandpont, a touring exhibition, a substantial website, a 40-minute documentary film and a Book of Remembrance which is on permanent display in the church.

We meet at the Exeter Hall, Oxford Road, Kidlington, OX5 1AB, with the talk starting at 8:00pm. Doors open at 7:15pm, when there will be advisors offering computer and genealogy help, and tea and coffee will be available.

Jun 262018
 

On Monday, 23 July, Muriel Pilkington will talk to Oxfordshire FHS on:

The Oxford Canal and its People

The speaker often goes to Oxford and is fascinated by its history. One aspect of that history, that has nothing to do with the university, is the Oxford Canal. She spent a fascinating six months researching the story of the development, heyday and decline of canals in England in general and the Oxford Canal in particular. The talk first looks at how canals have developed in the past two millennia , and then it focuses on their importance to the development of the industrial revolution in this country. The need to build bridges, cut tunnels, build aqueducts meant that huge engineering expertise and innovation evolved. The canal companies were the ancestors of the development of numerous companies and financial speculation that were such a feature of the nineteenth century. The Oxford canal serves as a good illustration of the role played in the way that canals formed a national network for the distribution of goods in a way that had never been possible before. It also looks at the men, women and children who spent their lives working on the canals and finally it speculates about the possible future of this fascinating part of the national infrastructure.

Muriel Pilkington read history at Oxford University and then began a career in teaching. Apart from some time off for having a family, she worked in schools for well over 30 years, ending as head teacher of Wycombe High School, a post she held for 12 years. Although her love of history continued, she inevitably became increasingly interested in education. She was awarded two Certificates of Advanced Professional Studies in Education at the Cambridge Institute and an Honorary Doctorate at the Bucks New University in 2006 for services to education. She was active in the Association of School and College Leaders and was the president of the Bucks, Berks and Oxon section. She also served as governor in a range of educational institutions including vice chair of a university senate, membership of the council of a drama school, chair of a Pupil Referral Unit and four governorships of schools in Buckinghamshire. She now works as an educational consultant and writer for a national centre for education management. After her retirement, she has returned to her pet subject of history and started giving talks to a variety of societies and other institutions and clubs, giving her fees to charity. She is also a fairly active supporter of her Oxford college. After retiring, she and her husband relocated to Witney in Oxfordshire and used some of their proceeds from the sale of their former house in Buckinghamshire to acquire a presence in France. They belong to a variety of groups in each town. Her husband is an active member of the Lions club in Witney and in France and Muriel helps their work in both towns. They are sponsors of the Oxford Philharmonic Orchestra.

We meet at the Exeter Hall, Oxford Road, Kidlington, OX5 1AB, with the talk starting at 8:00pm. Doors open at 7:15pm, when there will be advisors offering computer and genealogy help, and tea and coffee will be available.

May 222018
 

On Monday, 25 June, after the AGM, Christopher Fance will talk to Oxfordshire FHS on:

Finding Relatives using DNA Tests

Christopher will explain what he hoped to discover by taking two DNA tests and what the results of the tests showed. Like many family historians, he has a number of ‘brick walls’ in his ancestry. He has obtained new information which has shed new light on his mother’s ancestors. He will also explain where the results have been problematic.

At present he arranges speakers for the main meetings of OFHS in the Exeter Hall in Kidlington and is a member of the society’s committee. He is a retired schoolmaster and has been working on his and others’ ancestry for many years. He has researched individuals in Canada, the USA, South Africa, India, Burma and Australia.

We meet at the Exeter Hall, Oxford Road, Kidlington, OX5 1AB, with the talk starting at 8:00pm. Doors open at 7:15pm, when there will be advisors offering computer and genealogy help, and tea and coffee will be available.

May 222018
 

On Monday, 4 June 2018, the subject of the Oxfordshire Family History Society meeting will be ‘Have you been here; seen this; done that?’, with the talk given by Wendy Archer.

Wendy says she will talk about some fasinating, but perhaps not so well known, websites to visit, and various tips she hopes the audience will find useful.

Wendy is the Volunteers Coordinator of OFHS, and is also a member of the computer group panel.

We meet at the Exeter Hall, Oxford Road, Kidlington, OX5 1AB, with the meeting starting at 7:30pm. Doors open at 7:15pm, when there will be a warm welcome for all.

Apr 242018
 

On Monday, 21 May, Dr. Simon Wenham will talk to Oxfordshire FHS on:

Poverty, Pestilence and Public Health in Victorian Britain

Britain may have been the ‘workshop of the world’ in the Victorian period, but the sceptre of poverty and pestilence loomed large over the lives of many of its citizens. A large proportion of people were not only close to the bread line, but repeated epidemics decimated whole swathes of the population. This talk explores the wealth and health of the British during the Victorian period and the State’s attempt to improve conditions.

Dr Simon Wenham is a member of the part-time tutor panel of Oxford University’s Continuing Education Department, where he focuses mainly on Victorian history.

We meet at the Exeter Hall, Oxford Road, Kidlington, OX5 1AB, with the talk starting at 8:00pm. Doors open at 7:15pm, when there will be advisors offering computer and genealogy help, and tea and coffee will be available.

Apr 062018
 

 

On Monday, 9 April 2018, the subject of the Oxfordshire Family History Society meeting will be ‘Fixing Photos’, with the talk given by Alan Simpson.

Alan says he will demonstrate some of the techniques you can use to enhance the visual appearance of damaged and faded old photographs. It will be an interactive session so if anyone cares to bring along an old photograph or two, Alan is prepared to rise to the challenge and will have a scanner and camera to hand. Don’t expect miracles though!. If information is completely lost from the original it cannot be recovered but what does remain can often be shown to much better effect, as evidence this snap of a Sutton family gathering in Yorkshire taken around 1919.

Alan is the Chairman of the OFHS computer group panel, and, as well, he carries out searches for the Society’s Search Services. He’s also our Monumental Inscriptions Coordinator.
We meet at the Exeter Hall, Oxford Road, Kidlington, OX5 1AB, with the meeting starting at 7:30pm. Doors open at 7:15pm, when there will be a warm welcome for all.

 

Mar 272018
 

On Monday, 23 April, Tom Doig will talk to Oxfordshire FHS on:

Old photographs; their identification and dating

Great grand-mother’s boxes of photographs, particularly her cartes de visite, were a source of fascination when we were children. She knew who the people were and so rarely wrote their names on the back. Many Victorian photographs were taken on specific occasions, such as coming of age, emigration or wedding anniversaries. Using unsual techniques, the speaker will look for clues for their identification and suggest procedures for dating them. He will spend some time before his talk discussing old photographs that members of the society may like to bring from their collections.

Tom Doig is a qualified engineer, teacher and social historian researching rural life in the 19th and 20th century. He is well known for his books on local history and for his radio and television programmes and has lectured widely in the UK and abroad. During the 1990’s, he held the post of Director of the Cambridge and County Folk Museum and subsequently the Amberley Industrial Museum. Currently, he is Honorary Curator to the 398th USAF Bomber Group Museum at Nuthampstead. Tom has recently the completed five books of old photographs in a series on Hertfordshire and Cambridgeshire for the Francis Frith Collection. A member of the University of Cambridge, and a Fellow of the Society of Genealogists, Tom Doig served a term as Vice-President of the Cambridge Antiquarian Society. He lives in a remote rural part of north Hertfordshire in a converted cattle shed built during the 1840’s as part of a model farmstead. When relaxing from his history research, Tom devotes his time to the preservation of his 1923 Morris ‘Bullnose’ Cowley and 1973 Triumph Stag car.

We meet at the Exeter Hall, Oxford Road, Kidlington, OX5 1AB, with the talk starting at 8:00pm. Doors open at 7:15pm, when there will be advisors offering computer and genealogy help, and tea and coffee will be available.

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