Christopher Fance

Oct 022018
 

On Monday, 22 October, Helen Ford will talk to Oxfordshire FHS on:

Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy … Family History and Trade Unions

This illustrated talk will provide an introduction to the Modern Records Centre at Warwick University and an overview of the wide range of occupations and trade union collections held there. Using several examples of different trade unions archives Helen will provide details of the specific types of membership records and the information they often contain, including marital status, employer, sickness and unemployment payments, retirement and cause of death. The talk will focus on the transport workers, carpenters and printing trades. It will also touch on other sources in the collections such as photographs and records of social activities.

Helen has been an archivist for over 30 years and has been Archive Manager at the Modern Records Centre, University of Warwick for the past 11 years. Previous posts were at Devon County Record Office, Sheffield City Archives and Rochester Archive service. She has also worked as archivist for Laura Ashley plc and British Gas plc. Helen has worked on her own family tree and given many talks on archive sources for genealogists.

We meet at the Exeter Hall, Oxford Road, Kidlington, OX5 1AB, with the talk starting at 8:00pm. Doors open at 7:15pm, when there will be advisors offering computer and genealogy help, and tea and coffee will be available.

Jul 242018
 

On Monday, 24 September, Liz Woolley will talk to Oxfordshire FHS on:

66 Men of Grandpont 1914-18

Sixty-six men are named on the First World War memorial in St Matthew’s church in Grandpont in south Oxford. In 2015 a team of local volunteers set out to learn more about these men, the neighbourhood they left behind, and the impact of the First World War on this one small Victorian suburb. The result is an innovative community history project which has uncovered some surprises, involved hundreds of people and captured the imaginations of those far beyond the local area. This talk explores some of the 66 men’s lives and explains how the project provides a model for other local groups who are thinking of carrying out similar work. Excerpts from a documentary film which has been made as part of the project will be shown. 

Liz lives in Oxford and has an MSc in English Local History from the University’s Department for Continuing Education. In 2015-16 she co-ordinated a community history project, ’66 Men of Grandpont 1914-18′, which researched the lives of the men named on the First World War memorial in St Matthew’s church in south Oxford. The project involved hundreds of local people and resulted in a poppy trail around the streets of Grandpont, a touring exhibition, a substantial website, a 40-minute documentary film and a Book of Remembrance which is on permanent display in the church.

We meet at the Exeter Hall, Oxford Road, Kidlington, OX5 1AB, with the talk starting at 8:00pm. Doors open at 7:15pm, when there will be advisors offering computer and genealogy help, and tea and coffee will be available.

Jun 262018
 

On Monday, 23 July, Muriel Pilkington will talk to Oxfordshire FHS on:

The Oxford Canal and its People

The speaker often goes to Oxford and is fascinated by its history. One aspect of that history, that has nothing to do with the university, is the Oxford Canal. She spent a fascinating six months researching the story of the development, heyday and decline of canals in England in general and the Oxford Canal in particular. The talk first looks at how canals have developed in the past two millennia , and then it focuses on their importance to the development of the industrial revolution in this country. The need to build bridges, cut tunnels, build aqueducts meant that huge engineering expertise and innovation evolved. The canal companies were the ancestors of the development of numerous companies and financial speculation that were such a feature of the nineteenth century. The Oxford canal serves as a good illustration of the role played in the way that canals formed a national network for the distribution of goods in a way that had never been possible before. It also looks at the men, women and children who spent their lives working on the canals and finally it speculates about the possible future of this fascinating part of the national infrastructure.

Muriel Pilkington read history at Oxford University and then began a career in teaching. Apart from some time off for having a family, she worked in schools for well over 30 years, ending as head teacher of Wycombe High School, a post she held for 12 years. Although her love of history continued, she inevitably became increasingly interested in education. She was awarded two Certificates of Advanced Professional Studies in Education at the Cambridge Institute and an Honorary Doctorate at the Bucks New University in 2006 for services to education. She was active in the Association of School and College Leaders and was the president of the Bucks, Berks and Oxon section. She also served as governor in a range of educational institutions including vice chair of a university senate, membership of the council of a drama school, chair of a Pupil Referral Unit and four governorships of schools in Buckinghamshire. She now works as an educational consultant and writer for a national centre for education management. After her retirement, she has returned to her pet subject of history and started giving talks to a variety of societies and other institutions and clubs, giving her fees to charity. She is also a fairly active supporter of her Oxford college. After retiring, she and her husband relocated to Witney in Oxfordshire and used some of their proceeds from the sale of their former house in Buckinghamshire to acquire a presence in France. They belong to a variety of groups in each town. Her husband is an active member of the Lions club in Witney and in France and Muriel helps their work in both towns. They are sponsors of the Oxford Philharmonic Orchestra.

We meet at the Exeter Hall, Oxford Road, Kidlington, OX5 1AB, with the talk starting at 8:00pm. Doors open at 7:15pm, when there will be advisors offering computer and genealogy help, and tea and coffee will be available.

May 222018
 

On Monday, 25 June, after the AGM, Christopher Fance will talk to Oxfordshire FHS on:

Finding Relatives using DNA Tests

Christopher will explain what he hoped to discover by taking two DNA tests and what the results of the tests showed. Like many family historians, he has a number of ‘brick walls’ in his ancestry. He has obtained new information which has shed new light on his mother’s ancestors. He will also explain where the results have been problematic.

At present he arranges speakers for the main meetings of OFHS in the Exeter Hall in Kidlington and is a member of the society’s committee. He is a retired schoolmaster and has been working on his and others’ ancestry for many years. He has researched individuals in Canada, the USA, South Africa, India, Burma and Australia.

We meet at the Exeter Hall, Oxford Road, Kidlington, OX5 1AB, with the talk starting at 8:00pm. Doors open at 7:15pm, when there will be advisors offering computer and genealogy help, and tea and coffee will be available.

Apr 242018
 

On Monday, 21 May, Dr. Simon Wenham will talk to Oxfordshire FHS on:

Poverty, Pestilence and Public Health in Victorian Britain

Britain may have been the ‘workshop of the world’ in the Victorian period, but the sceptre of poverty and pestilence loomed large over the lives of many of its citizens. A large proportion of people were not only close to the bread line, but repeated epidemics decimated whole swathes of the population. This talk explores the wealth and health of the British during the Victorian period and the State’s attempt to improve conditions.

Dr Simon Wenham is a member of the part-time tutor panel of Oxford University’s Continuing Education Department, where he focuses mainly on Victorian history.

We meet at the Exeter Hall, Oxford Road, Kidlington, OX5 1AB, with the talk starting at 8:00pm. Doors open at 7:15pm, when there will be advisors offering computer and genealogy help, and tea and coffee will be available.

Mar 272018
 

On Monday, 23 April, Tom Doig will talk to Oxfordshire FHS on:

Old photographs; their identification and dating

Great grand-mother’s boxes of photographs, particularly her cartes de visite, were a source of fascination when we were children. She knew who the people were and so rarely wrote their names on the back. Many Victorian photographs were taken on specific occasions, such as coming of age, emigration or wedding anniversaries. Using unsual techniques, the speaker will look for clues for their identification and suggest procedures for dating them. He will spend some time before his talk discussing old photographs that members of the society may like to bring from their collections.

Tom Doig is a qualified engineer, teacher and social historian researching rural life in the 19th and 20th century. He is well known for his books on local history and for his radio and television programmes and has lectured widely in the UK and abroad. During the 1990’s, he held the post of Director of the Cambridge and County Folk Museum and subsequently the Amberley Industrial Museum. Currently, he is Honorary Curator to the 398th USAF Bomber Group Museum at Nuthampstead. Tom has recently the completed five books of old photographs in a series on Hertfordshire and Cambridgeshire for the Francis Frith Collection. A member of the University of Cambridge, and a Fellow of the Society of Genealogists, Tom Doig served a term as Vice-President of the Cambridge Antiquarian Society. He lives in a remote rural part of north Hertfordshire in a converted cattle shed built during the 1840’s as part of a model farmstead. When relaxing from his history research, Tom devotes his time to the preservation of his 1923 Morris ‘Bullnose’ Cowley and 1973 Triumph Stag car.

We meet at the Exeter Hall, Oxford Road, Kidlington, OX5 1AB, with the talk starting at 8:00pm. Doors open at 7:15pm, when there will be advisors offering computer and genealogy help, and tea and coffee will be available.

Feb 272018
 

On Monday, 26 March, Malcolm Graham will talk to Oxfordshire FHS on:

Women in Oxford during the Great War

The talk about Women in Oxford during the Great War will cover women’s reactions to the war and its effects on home and family life; the part played by university women; the range of work, both paid and voluntary, undertaken by local women; the new financial independence enjoyed by some women; moral panic about khaki fever among young women and girls; and society’s changing attitudes to women (women’s suffrage, health and housing).

Malcolm Graham is an Oxford local historian, now retired after a professional career as local studies librarian and then Head of Oxfordshire Studies with Oxfordshire County Council. He has published many books and articles about the city and county, including Oxfordshire at War about the county in the Second World War in 1994 and, in 2014, Oxford in the Great War. When he retired in 2008, he was honoured to be made one of Oxfordshire Family History Society’s Vice-Presidents for his work in improving the county’s services for family historians.

We meet at the Exeter Hall, Oxford Road, Kidlington, OX5 1AB, with the talk starting at 8:00pm. Doors open at 7:15pm, when there will be advisors offering computer and genealogy help, and tea and coffee will be available.

Jan 232018
 

On Monday, 26 February, Maggie Loughran will talk to Oxfordshire FHS on:

Researching ancestors in Ireland

Over the centuries, one of Ireland’s greatest exports has been its people. This has taken many guises be it voluntarily to travel the world, to explore seeking fame and fortune, economic migrants, trade, colonise, govern or forcibly transported, to fight or to garrison some far off settlement. It is estimated that there are over one million people of Irish birth in Britain today, plus numerous second, third or fourth generation Irish. The major challenge to those of us with Irish ancestors is to determine their actual place of birth, without this it is nigh on impossible to undertakeany research within Ireland, even if you trying to research a fairly uncommon surname. This talk will guide you through sources to help determine your ancestors place of birth and also look at some of the more easily accessible Irish records.

Maggie Loughran is a lecturer, educator and author, regularly contributing articles on family and local history to various journals and magazines and is co-author of the best selling ‘Discover Your Roots’ (published 2006). She has lectured extensively both in the UK and USA and organised courses and conferences on family and local history related subjects. She is a past Chairman of both local and family history societies and a past Administrator of the UK based, Federation of Family History Societies. Also for the blog: She is half Irish and has been actively researching her own and her husband’s Irish ancestors for over 25 years.

By courtesy of www.dreamstime.com

We meet at the Exeter Hall, Oxford Road, Kidlington, OX5 1AB, with the talk starting at 8:00pm. Doors open at 7:15pm, when there will be advisors offering computer and genealogy help, and tea and coffee will be available.

Nov 282017
 

On Monday, 22 January, Stephen Barker will talk to Oxfordshire FHS on:

Oxfordshire on the Home Front 1914-18

‘Oxfordshire on the Home Front 1914-18’ will explain about the impact of the war in the towns and countryside. It will focus upon fundraising and charitable events, munitions production, recruitment, the effects upon women and children, the fear of invasion, the influx of Belgian refugees and many other themes. The talk is fully illustrated and uses testimony from those who were there.

Stephen Barker is an independent Heritage Advisor with many years experience in the sector gained through working with a number of museums, universities, charities and other heritage organisations. He has managed and curated a significant number of historical projects. He is currently working with the History Faculty, University of Oxford and the Soldiers of Oxfordshire Museum. Stephen specialises in military history, particularly the First World War and British Civil Wars.

We meet at the Exeter Hall, Oxford Road, Kidlington, OX5 1AB, with the talk starting at 8:00pm. Doors open at 7:15pm, when there will be advisors offering computer and genealogy help, and tea and coffee will be available.

Oct 242017
 

On Monday, 27 November, Chris and Judy Rouse will talk to Oxfordshire FHS on:

The History of the Midland Railway and its Staff Records

This is a good starting point for research into railway ancestry – using our knowledge of the Midland Railway to provide examples. The speakers provide a brief history of the Midland Railway and then a more in depth look at the various types of records available for researchers: – Staff records held at the National Archives and elsewhere, Board of Trade Accident reports, Directors and other Minutes, Local and National newspapers, census records, photographs, maps and illustrations etc. Researchers can then adapt the techniques to researching their own particular railway ancestor on any British railway.

Chris Rouse, a retired Chartered Accountant has Midland Railway ancestry, including signalmen, platelayers and guards, He has always been keenly interested in researching the history of railways in England and Wales, was one of the first members of the Midland Railway Society, being its Annual President in 2008.He has written a series of articles on early Midland railway accidents, and other subjects relating to the Midland Railway. Judy Rouse, a retired librarian is a Family History researcher of long standing, with ancestry based in Wiltshire, Shropshire and Stafford shire. She is a member of Wilts FHS and amongst other things over the years has answered enquiries on its Monumental Inscriptions Index, and had a period as its General Secretary. Judy also has railway men among her ancestors, in her case working for the Great Western Railway Company, which she has been able to research successfully. She also gives talks and writes articles on her Wiltshire and Shropshire ancestry.

We meet at the Exeter Hall, Oxford Road, Kidlington, OX5 1AB, with the talk starting at 8:00pm. Doors open at 7:15pm, when there will be advisors offering computer and genealogy help, and tea and coffee will be available.

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